Virginia Gentleman

Saul Steinberg at One Hundred

newyorker:

Ian Frazier remembers the artist Saul Steinberg:

“Perhaps because he survived the war, he made a point of not doing things that he didn’t want to do, true to the sincerest instincts of his child self. He did what he wanted more faithfully and to better artistic effect than anybody I’ve ever known.”

Above: The artist Saul Steinberg holds hands with a cutout photograph of himself as a boy. Photograph by Evelyn Hofer.

(Source: newyorker.com)

johndarnielle:

fightingforanimals:

asylum-art:

Realistic House Plant Cupcake by Alana Jones-Mann

Artist on Tumblr | Facebook

Inspired by a gardening project, Brooklyn-based baker Alana Jones-Mann decided to make cupcakes that look like common miniature cacti. Using frosting, green food coloring and of course, baking talent, Alana successfully made a bunch of cacti cupcake cuteness and even planted them on soil (crushed graham crackers). These realistic cacti cupcake are made with such impressive details that some of them even appear sharp to the touch. If you like those edible cacti and want to make your own, head on over to Alana Jones-Mann’s blog and find the step-by-step tutorial.

omfg

for a guy who can really completely annihilate a whole bag of candy at one sitting I have a pretty low threshold for cupcakes - like, I’ll eat one, which is weird for me, I don’t eat one of anything generally - but CHECK OUT THESE WICKED-ASS CUPCAKES

npr:

You may not know the name Homer Laughlin, a china factory in Newell, W. Va., but you’ll likely recognize — or have eaten off of — its most famous product: brightly colored, informal pottery called Fiesta.

While most of America’s china factories have closed, unable to compete with “made in China” or Japan or Mexico, Homer Laughlin, which set up shop on the banks of the Ohio River in 1873, is still going strong. It employs about 1,000 people.

Linda Wertheimer takes us into the depths of the factory — which feels like a relic from a different time — to show us how Fiesta has kept this company going.

Photos/GIFs by Ross Mantle for NPR